Mr. Boykiv

Yuriy Boykiv

Co-Founder and CEO

Gravity

Yuriy Boykiv is the co-founder and CEO of Gravity, a full-service advertising agency that helps brands connect with cultural and international consumers. Yuriy brings Gravity clients over 12 years of leading multicultural and international marketing experience. Under his leadership, the agency has become the fastest-growing multicultural ad agency in the country and has been featured on the Inc. 5000 list three years in a row.

Prior to founding Gravity, he was the director of international business at DIRECTV, driving the growth and business of the WorldDirect platform that consisted of more than 65 international channels in 16 different languages. His responsibilities included the entire spectrum of global markets, including Asian-American, European, and Middle Eastern. Before joining DIRECTV, he was the vice president of client services at a New York-based boutique agency where he oversaw the strategy and management of client campaigns and the agencyís operations and business development. In this role, he led the campaigns of major clients such as the CIA, Lufthansa, and MoneyGram.

Yuriy has an MBA in finance from Pace University and is fluent in four languages. Yuriy also completed his post-graduate work at Harvard Business School. His achievements include Best Media Campaign of the Year from MediaPost and Best Multiethnic Campaign of the Year from the AFA Mosaic Awards. Yuriy is a weekly columnist for Inc., writing about entrepreneurship, global trends, leadership, and marketing. His expertise has been recognized by USA Today, Advertising Age, MediaPost, Latin Post, and The Agency Post. Connect with Yuriy on Twitter.

Please visit www.mediagravity.com for more information.

Mr. Boykiv can be contacted at 646-486-000 or yuriyboykiv@yahoo.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.