Ms. Hutchins

Amy Hutchins

Lead Product Manager

BookingSuite (USA), Inc.

Amy Hutchins is a software professional with 12 years of experience designing and building consumer software and online services solutions. She is a Lead Product Manager at BookingSuite, and has spent the past three years focused exclusively on solutions for the hospitality industry. An advocate for non-tech-savvy consumers, Amy emphasizes a premium user experience in all software products.

In her current role, Amy has traveled all over the world meeting with hoteliers and learning about their specific pain points and everyday work experiences. By analyzing the nuances of how different hospitality software systems interact with each other, Amy strives to empower properties of all sizes by providing simple end-to-end software solutions to meet their unique needs. She loves the challenge of taking conceptually difficult tasks and distilling them into easy and intuitive solutions to facilitate increased productivity in work and life.

Before focusing on hospitality, Amy spent seven years at Microsoft in the Windows division. She spent much of her time in the identity and security space there. She brings that strong background to the hospitality industry, where she works to ensure a safe and enjoyable experience for hotel staff and guests alike.

Amy graduated from Duke University with a major in Computer Science and minors in Economics and Classical Civilizations. She doesnít get to use the latter quite as much as she had hoped, but it does prove useful when sheís traveling to historic destinations.

Please visit http://suite.booking.com/ for more information.

Ms. Hutchins can be contacted at (314) 302-9952 or amy.hutchins@booking.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.