Ms. Hutchins

Amy Hutchins

Lead Product Manager

BookingSuite (USA), Inc.

Amy Hutchins is a software professional with 12 years of experience designing and building consumer software and online services solutions. She is a Lead Product Manager at BookingSuite, and has spent the past three years focused exclusively on solutions for the hospitality industry. An advocate for non-tech-savvy consumers, Amy emphasizes a premium user experience in all software products.

In her current role, Amy has traveled all over the world meeting with hoteliers and learning about their specific pain points and everyday work experiences. By analyzing the nuances of how different hospitality software systems interact with each other, Amy strives to empower properties of all sizes by providing simple end-to-end software solutions to meet their unique needs. She loves the challenge of taking conceptually difficult tasks and distilling them into easy and intuitive solutions to facilitate increased productivity in work and life.

Before focusing on hospitality, Amy spent seven years at Microsoft in the Windows division. She spent much of her time in the identity and security space there. She brings that strong background to the hospitality industry, where she works to ensure a safe and enjoyable experience for hotel staff and guests alike.

Amy graduated from Duke University with a major in Computer Science and minors in Economics and Classical Civilizations. She doesnít get to use the latter quite as much as she had hoped, but it does prove useful when sheís traveling to historic destinations.

Please visit http://suite.booking.com/ for more information.

Ms. Hutchins can be contacted at (314) 302-9952 or amy.hutchins@booking.com

Coming Up In The December Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Hotel Law: Issues & Events
There is not a single area of a hotelís operation that isnít touched by some aspect of the law. Hotels and management companies employ an army of lawyers to advise and, if necessary, litigate issues which arise in the course of conducting their business. These lawyers typically specialize in specific areas of the law Ė real estate, construction, development, leasing, liability, franchising, food & beverage, human resources, environmental, insurance, taxes and more. In addition, issues and events can occur within the industry that have a major impact on the whole, and can spur further legal activity. One event which is certain to cause repercussions is Marriott Internationalís acquisition of Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide. This newly combined company is now the largest hotel company in the world, encompassing 30 hotel brands, 5,500 hotels under management, and 1.1 million hotel rooms worldwide. In the hospitality industry, scale is particularly important Ė the most profitable companies are those with the most rooms in the most locations. As a result, this mega- transaction is likely to provoke an increase in Mergers & Acquisitions industry-wide. Many experts believe other larger hotel companies will now join forces with smaller operators to avoid being outpaced in the market. Companies that had not previously considered consolidation are now more likely to do so. Another legal issue facing the industry is the regulation of alternative lodging companies such as Airbnb and other firms that offer private, short-term rentals. Cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles and Santa Monica are at the forefront of efforts to legalize and control short-term rentals. However, those cities are finding itís much easier to adopt regulations on short-term rentals than it is to actually enforce them. The December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine these and other critical issues pertaining to hotel law and how some companies are adapting to them.