Mr. Patterson

Drew Patterson

Co-Founder and CEO

CheckMate

Drew Patterson is the co-founder and CEO of CheckMate the leading travel technology company building hotel communications tools to deliver a better guest experience. From before check-in through departure, CheckMate’s tools enable hotels and their guests to have a two-way conversation through any means of communication - email, text, or a native app. CheckMate’s mobile tools improve every facet of the guest experience – from a mobile check-in that avoids a wait at the front desk and deals on room upgrades to alerts when one’s room is ready. Through partnerships with hotels, OTAs and TMCs, CheckMate has improved the travel experience of over 500,000 travelers staying at over 51,000 hotels.

Mr. Patterson is also the CEO of Room 77, a position he's held since the hotel search engine acquired CheckMate in January of 2013. Drew previously co-founded Jetsetter, which he helped grow from an idea to nearly $100 million annual bookings run rate. He was also part of the founding team at KAYAK and served in a variety of key leadership roles from 2004 to 2009. Mr. Patterson helped to reshape the online travel landscape by evolving the distribution model and increasing industry and consumer awareness around the value of “search” in travel.

Please visit checkmate.io for more information.

Mr. Patterson can be contacted at 415-849-3537 or drew@checkmate.io

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.