Mr. Fifelski

Ted Fifelski

President and Co-Founder

SimplyTapp

Ted Fifelski is president and co-founder of SimplyTapp, the original developer of host card emulation (HCE) technology. Seeing the incredible potential that NFC had for banking and payments, Ted along with CEO Doug Yeager founded SimplyTapp in Austin in 2011. Their goal was to make mobile NFC payment technology a reality for card issuers, who could then offer their customers a secure, customizable and contactless user experience. Host card emulation describes the software architecture that did just that. HCE creates secure, identical card representation on a mobile device for the purposes of payments, transit and access.

As President of SimplyTapp Ted is empowering more banks and card issuers with easy-to-deploy mobile NFC payments services for their customers. Prior to SimplyTapp, he founded MyPurchaseGives.com, a company that helped individuals and organizations make a sustainable contribution to the global community through everyday purchases. Ted has also held leadership positions within the Technology and Intellectual Property Research and Valuation team at Arthur Financial Services (AFS) and at World Trade Center Illinois (WTCI), where he facilitated relationships between foreign companies and businesses in the greater Chicago and Midwest regions.

Ted holds his B.S. in Business Administration from Franciscan University of Steubenville. He lives in Austin, where he enjoys meeting other members of the cityís vibrant technology scene. Ted is a regular speaker at numerous events within the mobile and payments industries. To learn more about SimplyTapp and get in touch with Ted, visit www.simplytapp.com.

Please visit www.simplytapp.com for more information.

Mr. Fifelski can be contacted at

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.