Mr. Muller

David Muller

Founder

DCM Fabrication

David Muller is a visual translator, a professional fluent in the language of design, which enables him to transform an artist's sketches and renderings into a display of Christmastime enchantment, Swiss perfection and a stage on behalf of a grand production celebrating, respectively, fashion as a lifestyle and museums as gateways to the wonders of the universe.

As the Founder of DCM Fabrication, Mr. Muller uses light, technology and various accessories to convert a window or an exhibition into a scene of collegiate bonhomie – of mannequins outfitted by Ralph Lauren, standing in a room adorned with vintage pennants, classic books, steamer trunks, suitcases and other pieces of luggage – in which the brass buttons of a navy blazer sparkle like gold coins and a striped silk tie is a makeshift belt for a pair of flat-front khakis.

Creating that dream world, under navy blue awnings stamped with Lauren's iconic polo player, or segueing from this theme to the minimalism of Calvin Klein's aesthetic, or celebrating the ultra-luxury of a Patek Philippe timepiece, that “You never really own a Patek Philippe. You merely look after it for the next generation,” all of this – the materials, the staging, the infusion of beauty and elegance – is what Mr. Muller does.

From his work with the Gottesman Hall of Planet Earth at the American Museum of Natural History to his projects for J. Crew and The Frye Company, Mr. Muller makes a two-dimensional drawing a three-dimensional piece of commercial art.

A graduate of Morrisville State College, he resides in New York City.

Mr. Muller can be contacted at muller543@aol.com

Coming Up In The May Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Eco-Friendly Practices: The Value of Sustainability
The hotel industry continues to make remarkable progress in implementing sustainability policies and procedures in their properties throughout the world. As a result, they continue to reap the benefits of increased profitability, enhanced guest experiences, and improved community relations. In addition, as industry standards are codified and adopted worldwide, hotels can now compare how their operations measure up against their competitors in terms of sustainable practices and accomplishments. This capacity to publicly compare and contrast is spurring competition and driving innovation as hotels do not wish to be left behind in this area. Water management and conservation is still a primary issue as population growth, urbanization, pollution and wasteful consumption patterns place increasing demands on freshwater supply. Water recycling; installing low-flow fixtures; using digital sensors to control water usage; and even harvesting rainwater are just a few things that some hotels are doing to preserve this precious resource. Waste management is another major concern. Through policies of reduce, reuse and recycle, some hotels are implementing “zero-waste” programs with the goal of substantially reducing their landfill waste which produces carbon dioxide and methane gases. Other hotels have established comprehensive training programs that reinforce the value of sustainability. There is employee engagement through posters and quizzes, and even contests are held to increase innovation, sensitivity and environmental awareness. Some hotels are also monitoring a guest’s energy usage and rewarding those who consumed less energy with gifts and incentives. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document how some hotels are integrating eco-friendly practices into their operations and how they and the environment are benefiting from them.