Mr. Muller

David Muller

Founder

DCM Fabrication

David Muller is a visual translator, a professional fluent in the language of design, which enables him to transform an artist's sketches and renderings into a display of Christmastime enchantment, Swiss perfection and a stage on behalf of a grand production celebrating, respectively, fashion as a lifestyle and museums as gateways to the wonders of the universe.

As the Founder of DCM Fabrication, Mr. Muller uses light, technology and various accessories to convert a window or an exhibition into a scene of collegiate bonhomie – of mannequins outfitted by Ralph Lauren, standing in a room adorned with vintage pennants, classic books, steamer trunks, suitcases and other pieces of luggage – in which the brass buttons of a navy blazer sparkle like gold coins and a striped silk tie is a makeshift belt for a pair of flat-front khakis.

Creating that dream world, under navy blue awnings stamped with Lauren's iconic polo player, or segueing from this theme to the minimalism of Calvin Klein's aesthetic, or celebrating the ultra-luxury of a Patek Philippe timepiece, that “You never really own a Patek Philippe. You merely look after it for the next generation,” all of this – the materials, the staging, the infusion of beauty and elegance – is what Mr. Muller does.

From his work with the Gottesman Hall of Planet Earth at the American Museum of Natural History to his projects for J. Crew and The Frye Company, Mr. Muller makes a two-dimensional drawing a three-dimensional piece of commercial art.

A graduate of Morrisville State College, he resides in New York City.

Mr. Muller can be contacted at muller543@aol.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.