Mr. Muller

David Muller

Founder

DCM Fabrication

David Muller is a visual translator, a professional fluent in the language of design, which enables him to transform an artist's sketches and renderings into a display of Christmastime enchantment, Swiss perfection and a stage on behalf of a grand production celebrating, respectively, fashion as a lifestyle and museums as gateways to the wonders of the universe.

As the Founder of DCM Fabrication, Mr. Muller uses light, technology and various accessories to convert a window or an exhibition into a scene of collegiate bonhomie – of mannequins outfitted by Ralph Lauren, standing in a room adorned with vintage pennants, classic books, steamer trunks, suitcases and other pieces of luggage – in which the brass buttons of a navy blazer sparkle like gold coins and a striped silk tie is a makeshift belt for a pair of flat-front khakis.

Creating that dream world, under navy blue awnings stamped with Lauren's iconic polo player, or segueing from this theme to the minimalism of Calvin Klein's aesthetic, or celebrating the ultra-luxury of a Patek Philippe timepiece, that “You never really own a Patek Philippe. You merely look after it for the next generation,” all of this – the materials, the staging, the infusion of beauty and elegance – is what Mr. Muller does.

From his work with the Gottesman Hall of Planet Earth at the American Museum of Natural History to his projects for J. Crew and The Frye Company, Mr. Muller makes a two-dimensional drawing a three-dimensional piece of commercial art.

A graduate of Morrisville State College, he resides in New York City.

Mr. Muller can be contacted at muller543@aol.com

Coming Up In The September Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Hotel Group Meetings: Blue Skies Ahead
After a decade of sacrifice and struggle, it seems that hotels and meeting planners have every reason to be optimistic about the group meeting business going forward. By every industry benchmark and measure, 2017 is shaping up to be a record year, which means more meetings in more locations for more attendees. And though no one in the industry is complaining about this rosy outlook, the strong demand is increasing competition among meeting planners across the board – for the most desirable locations, for the best hotels, for the most creative experiences, for the most talented chefs, and for the best technology available. Because of this robust demand, hotels are in the driver’s seat and they are flexing their collective muscles. Even though over 100,000 new rooms were added last year, hotel rates are expected to rise by a minimum of 4.0%, and they are also charging fees on amenities that were often gratis in the past. In addition, hotels are offering shorter lead times on booking commitments, forcing planners to sign contracts earlier than in past years. Planners are having to work more quickly and to commit farther in advance to secure key properties. Planners are also having to meet increased attendee expectations. They no longer are content with a trade show and a few dinners; they want an experience. Planners need to find ways to create a meaningful experience to ensure that attendees walk away with an impactful memory. This kind of experiential learning can generate a deeper emotional connection, which can ultimately result in increased brand recognition, client retention, and incremental sales. The September Hotel Business Review will examine issues relevant to group business and will report on what some hotels are doing to promote this sector of their operations.