Ms. Churchill

Elizabeth Churchill

Chief Revenue Officer

Aqua-Aston Hospitality

Elizabeth Churchill is Chief Revenue Officer of Aqua-Aston Hospitality, a premier hotel management group with an extensive portfolio of hotels and resorts in Hawaii and on the U.S. mainland.

Ms. Churchill oversees the marketing, sales, revenue management and reservations functions. She is a veteran marketer and sales leader with expertise in hotel rebranding and repositioning and extensive knowledge of the hospitality and tourism industries.

Ms. Churchill's marketing strengths include: setting strategic plans, executing on strategy to grow a business and drive profitability, turnaround strategies, building effective teams, driving ROI, branding and identity, analysis, technology vetting, e-Commerce and digital strategies, sales and sales leadership, revenue optimization and distribution, niche marketing and public relations.

Ms. Churchillís progressive marketing and revenue management techniques led to growth for Aqua Hospitality over the last ten years. Her tenure as part of the Aqua family began in 2005, during which she orchestrated a rebranding of the company which helped to triple the number of rooms it oversees. Ms. Churchillís accomplishments include transforming the former W Honolulu Hotel into the Lotus Honolulu, rescuing the iconic Ilikai Hotel & Suites on Oahu, transitioning Waileaís Diamond Resort into the trendy Hotel Wailea Maui, and reopening the historic Volcano House in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park on the Big Island.

Ms. Churchill is focused on developing and executing a holistic approach to Aqua-Aston Hospitality customers across all of its brands, and driving customer acquisition, retention and profitability.

Please visit www.aquahospitalityllc.com for more information.

Ms. Churchill can be contacted at 808-943-9291 or echurchill@aquahospitality.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.