Ms. Murphy

Carolyn Murphy

Marketing Specialist

Revinate

Carolyn Murphy is a Marketing Specialist at Revinate, a San Francisco-based software company. Revinate helps hotels know more about their guests so they can deliver personalized experiences that create valuable relationships and lifelong customers. Using guest data combined with Revinateís marketing engagement platform, hotels can better understand and engage their audiences, increasing loyalty and revenue. Over 25,000 of the world's leading hotels trust Revinate to help them reinvent the guest experience.

At Revinate, Ms. Murphy is responsible for content marketing, educational webinars, social media, and university relations. With experience in teaching English literature and composition at the college level, Ms. Murphy is passionate about learning and communication. She also enjoys helping others grow their knowledge and skills to become their best professional selves.

Ms. Murphy started her tech career in the booming startup scene in San Francisco. She has gained extensive experience with email marketing in both B2B and B2C capacities, marketing automation and personalization platforms, and she taught herself basic HTML and CSS. Since joining Revinate, she has become fluent in online reputation management and has extensive knowledge of email marketing best practices for hospitality. She has also had the opportunity to speak to students in programs like the Michigan State University School of Hospitality Business.

Born in Silicon Valley, Ms. Murphy currently resides in San Francisco. She received her undergraduate degree from the University of California, Riverside and her masterís degree from California College of the Arts in San Francisco.

Ms. Murphy can be contacted at carrie@revinate.com

Ms. Murphy can be contacted at carrie@revinate.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.