Ms. Finjer

Corey Finjer

Sr. Vice President

Hawkins International PR

Corey Finjer has been with Hawkins International PR (HIPR), a top-tier global PR firm specializing in travel lifestyle, hospitality and spa/wellness brands, for almost a decade. Since joining HIPR, she has overseen the launch of several major projects from the multi-million dollar redesign of Jumby Bay, A Rosewood Resort to the rebranding and opening of the former Versace mansion in Miami as The Villa By Barton G.

Ms. Finjer also oversees ongoing traditional and new media relations campaigns for luxury hotel brands, such as Dorchester Collection, independent boutique properties, such as XV Beacon in Boston, start-ups such as Flytographer and TINT, and airlines such as La Compagnie, among others.

Ms. Finjer also runs the agency’s digital division, amplifying traditional results-oriented media efforts by masterfully guiding existing and new clients across the complex digital space. The digital team has seen 200% growth over the past year, developing their clients’ strategic social initiatives and content, launching targeted influencer marketing programs, and elevating their community management action plans. Ultimately, she is responsible for changing the way luxury travel brands and individual properties reach and connect with their audiences - globally - across social media platforms.

Prior to joining HIPR, Ms. Finjer found her passion for the hospitality industry working in-house managing marketing and public relations for The Charles Hotel, a luxury property in Cambridge, MA. She received a bachelor of science in communications, summa cum laude, with a concentration in public relations, and a bachelor of arts in psychology, magna cum laude, from Boston University.

Ms. Finjer can be contacted at 212-255-6541 or corey@hawkpr.com

Coming Up In The May Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Eco-Friendly Practices: The Value of Sustainability
The hotel industry continues to make remarkable progress in implementing sustainability policies and procedures in their properties throughout the world. As a result, they continue to reap the benefits of increased profitability, enhanced guest experiences, and improved community relations. In addition, as industry standards are codified and adopted worldwide, hotels can now compare how their operations measure up against their competitors in terms of sustainable practices and accomplishments. This capacity to publicly compare and contrast is spurring competition and driving innovation as hotels do not wish to be left behind in this area. Water management and conservation is still a primary issue as population growth, urbanization, pollution and wasteful consumption patterns place increasing demands on freshwater supply. Water recycling; installing low-flow fixtures; using digital sensors to control water usage; and even harvesting rainwater are just a few things that some hotels are doing to preserve this precious resource. Waste management is another major concern. Through policies of reduce, reuse and recycle, some hotels are implementing “zero-waste” programs with the goal of substantially reducing their landfill waste which produces carbon dioxide and methane gases. Other hotels have established comprehensive training programs that reinforce the value of sustainability. There is employee engagement through posters and quizzes, and even contests are held to increase innovation, sensitivity and environmental awareness. Some hotels are also monitoring a guest’s energy usage and rewarding those who consumed less energy with gifts and incentives. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document how some hotels are integrating eco-friendly practices into their operations and how they and the environment are benefiting from them.