Ms. Finjer

Corey Finjer

Sr. Vice President

Hawkins International PR

Corey Finjer has been with Hawkins International PR (HIPR), a top-tier global PR firm specializing in travel lifestyle, hospitality and spa/wellness brands, for almost a decade. Since joining HIPR, she has overseen the launch of several major projects from the multi-million dollar redesign of Jumby Bay, A Rosewood Resort to the rebranding and opening of the former Versace mansion in Miami as The Villa By Barton G.

Ms. Finjer also oversees ongoing traditional and new media relations campaigns for luxury hotel brands, such as Dorchester Collection, independent boutique properties, such as XV Beacon in Boston, start-ups such as Flytographer and TINT, and airlines such as La Compagnie, among others.

Ms. Finjer also runs the agency’s digital division, amplifying traditional results-oriented media efforts by masterfully guiding existing and new clients across the complex digital space. The digital team has seen 200% growth over the past year, developing their clients’ strategic social initiatives and content, launching targeted influencer marketing programs, and elevating their community management action plans. Ultimately, she is responsible for changing the way luxury travel brands and individual properties reach and connect with their audiences - globally - across social media platforms.

Prior to joining HIPR, Ms. Finjer found her passion for the hospitality industry working in-house managing marketing and public relations for The Charles Hotel, a luxury property in Cambridge, MA. She received a bachelor of science in communications, summa cum laude, with a concentration in public relations, and a bachelor of arts in psychology, magna cum laude, from Boston University.

Ms. Finjer can be contacted at 212-255-6541 or corey@hawkpr.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.