Mr. Saunders

Tedd Saunders

Chief Sustainability Officer

The Saunders Hotel Group

Tedd Saunders is Chief Sustainability Officer of The Saunders Hotel Group, President of EcoLogical Solutions, and Co-Owner of The Lenox Hotel and hotels along the Eastern Seaboard of The United States.

Saunders Hotel Group is a fourth generation family business based in Boston. Often credited with pioneering luxury, urban ecotourism worldwide in 1989, he and his team continue to create game-changing sustainable business models for the world's largest service industry - travel and tourism.

In 1992 Mr. Saunders formed EcoLogical Solutions, which has advised The White House, HRH The Prince of Wales' Business Leaders Forum, Harvard University, Taj Hotels, Choice Hotels and other hotel companies around the globe.

With his industry leadership, Saunders Hotel Group has earned numerous prestigious honors including a U.S. Presidential Gold Medal, Energy Star Partner Of The Year Award and British Airways' Tourism for Tomorrow Prize. Feature stories in The New York Times, CNN, USA Today and NBC Nightly News praise their trendsetting approach and innovative accomplishments.

Mr. Saunders is the author of "The Bottom Line of Green is Black", published by Harper Collins. He sits on the Leadership Council of the Harvard School of Public Health and the board of its Center for Health & The Global Environment - as well as the boards of CERES, UCS (Union of Concerned Scientists), Woods Hole Research Center, E2 (Environmental Entrepreneurs) and ELMís Corporate Council.

Mr. Saunders can be contacted at 617-.421-.4910 or tsaunders@ecological-solutions.net

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.