Mr. Collins

Bruce Collins

Regional Director of Development, East

OTO Development

Bruce Collins has been Director of Development for OTO Development since the company's inception in 2004. In this time, the company has developed more than 50 hotels across the nation, representing more than $1 billion in development across a myriad of challenging markets, unique sites, and urban locations such as Chicago, Washington, D.C and New York City.

Mr. Collins is involved in all aspects of hotel development in the Eastern Region, which includes managing a team of Development Managers, completing initial site evaluations, due diligence, budgeting and analysis, design review, and all project management services.

His contributions have garnered significant industry recognition on behalf of OTO Development, and notably include the 2013 Best Conversion Award for the Hampton Brand—for the conversion of the iconic Kiplinger Editor’s Building into the Hampton Inn Washington, D.C./White House— and a 2014 Marriott Best Custom Architectural project for the Fairfield Inn & Suites Manhattan/Penn Station, NY.

Before joining OTO Devlopment, Mr. Collins was the Director of Construction for Extended Stay America and managed the company’s South East region. During that time, he directly participated in the development and construction of over 70 hotels in the Southeastern United States, and indirectly participated in many more through various other roles.

Mr. Collins has a Bachelor of Science in Design from Clemson University.

Mr. Collins can be contacted at 864-596-8930 or bcollins@otodevelopment.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.