Dr. Zemke

Dina Zemke

Assistant Professor William f. Harrah College of Hotel Administration

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Dina Marie Zemke, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the William F. Harrah College of Hotel Administration at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, where she primarily teaches courses in facilities management. Prior to her academic career, she obtained industry experience with Hilton Hotels, starting in the property operations department at the Waldorf-Astoria in New York City, followed by the Tarrytown Hilton. She followed that with a career in sales with Otis Elevator in New York and Wisconsin.

One of Dr. Zemke’s research interests is examining hotel design and its relationship with property performance and guest and employee satisfaction. The work is focusing on how to determine how assessing design quality can help in the capital reinvestment decision-making process. An additional research area examines how to incorporate hospitality principles into healthcare settings to improve hospital performance and patient satisfaction. Past projects include the studies of ambient scent and ambient noise in hospitality settings, gaming customer profiling, and hotel cleanliness. She has published in numerous academic journals and co-authored a textbook, Managing the Built Environment in Hospitality Facilities, with fellow UNLV faculty member Thomas Jones.

Dr. Zemke holds BOMI’s Real Property Administrator designation and is also holds the LEED-Green Associate credential. She is a member of the Nevada chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council, as well as the AH&LA’s Sustainability Committee. An active member of the Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Educators (CHRIE), she serves as the chair of the Facilities Management special interest group, which exists to support hospitality educators who teach facilities planning, management, and design. She is also a member of the CHRIE Research SIG and the Environmental Hospitality Issues SIG.

Dr. Zemke has a Ph.D. from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and MBA from the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management, and a BS from Cornell University’s School of Hotel Administration. Prior to returning to UNLV in 2012, she also taught in hospitality programs at the University of New Hampshire, Cornell University, and Johnson & Wales University – Charlotte.

Dr. Zemke can be contacted at 702-895-4844 or dina.zemke@unlv.edu

Coming Up In The May Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Eco-Friendly Practices: The Value of Sustainability
The hotel industry continues to make remarkable progress in implementing sustainability policies and procedures in their properties throughout the world. As a result, they continue to reap the benefits of increased profitability, enhanced guest experiences, and improved community relations. In addition, as industry standards are codified and adopted worldwide, hotels can now compare how their operations measure up against their competitors in terms of sustainable practices and accomplishments. This capacity to publicly compare and contrast is spurring competition and driving innovation as hotels do not wish to be left behind in this area. Water management and conservation is still a primary issue as population growth, urbanization, pollution and wasteful consumption patterns place increasing demands on freshwater supply. Water recycling; installing low-flow fixtures; using digital sensors to control water usage; and even harvesting rainwater are just a few things that some hotels are doing to preserve this precious resource. Waste management is another major concern. Through policies of reduce, reuse and recycle, some hotels are implementing “zero-waste” programs with the goal of substantially reducing their landfill waste which produces carbon dioxide and methane gases. Other hotels have established comprehensive training programs that reinforce the value of sustainability. There is employee engagement through posters and quizzes, and even contests are held to increase innovation, sensitivity and environmental awareness. Some hotels are also monitoring a guest’s energy usage and rewarding those who consumed less energy with gifts and incentives. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document how some hotels are integrating eco-friendly practices into their operations and how they and the environment are benefiting from them.