Mr. Tossell

David Tossell

Vice President

DataArt

David Tossell, CTC, Vice President, DataArt started in the mailroom of his family’s travel agency 20+ years ago and made his way across the industry working for companies such as Sabre, Travelocity and Virtuoso. David joined DataArt in 2014 as Vice President, Travel & Hospitality Practice, having most recently served as Vice President of Marketing for WMPH Vacations / iCruise.com.

Mr. Tossell is a serial entrepreneur, with experience ranging from global product marketing & development, to marketing promotions, business operations, SEO/SEM, and email marketing. Over the course of his career, he led many start-up businesses, including the Sabre Rewards travel agent loyalty program, and APInet, the travel distribution industry’s first extranet.

Most recently, Mr. Tossell oversaw the creation of TimeshareAdvisor – a review website for timeshare owners. At Travelocity, David oversaw the account team for the affiliate / private label distribution business with over 1,900 partners including Yahoo, AOL, American Express and AAA. During his time as CEO of CruiseLabs, he lead the company to a “runner-up” spot in the PhoCusWright Travel Innovation Summit and went on to establish a global network of over 70 cruise research and booking web sites,

Mr. Tossell received his BS in Business Administration from Pepperdine University and earned his Certified Travel Counselor (CTC) designation from The Travel Institute in 1997. He co-authored Technology In The Travel Industry (1998 edition), a textbook for The Travel Institute’s CTC training curriculum.

Mr. Tossell lives in Texas with his wife and two sons. The couple founded several programs in the Dallas / Fort Worth area aimed at helping families with Autistic children to travel and assisting with the education/rehabilitation of Autistic children via technology.

Mr. Tossell can be contacted at

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.