Mr. Hunt

John R. Hunt

Attorney

Stokes Wagner Hunt Martez & Terrell, ALC

John Hunt has litigated employment, labor and commercial law cases in over 75 federal and state courts throughout the United States. A substantial portion of this work has been devoted to the defense of businesses in the hospitality and restaurant industries. In addition to representing clients at trials, arbitrations and mediations, he provides counseling and advice on a variety of issues, including those involving, wage and hour requirements, employment discrimination, restrictive covenants, family and medical leave, union relations, contract negotiations and the preparation and implementation of personnel policies.

At Stokes Wagner, Mr. Hunt works to provide early, practical assessments of the pros and cons of each case and its potential economic and emotional consequences. Once this occurs, he and his team try to implement the best strategy to win at trial (or sooner) or resolve the dispute in other ways, including through mediation or arbitration. They follow the same approach in counseling and advice where they use their experience in the hospitality industry and with its unique labor and employment issues to identify the best and most practical solutions as quickly as possible.

A regular speaker at continuing legal education seminars, Mr. Hunt also helped the firm serve as general counsel to the Georgia Hospitality and Trial Association. Mr. Huntís practice has included work for Interstate Hotels, Radisson Hotels, Swiss Hotels, TGI Fridayís, Rare Hospitality Buena Vista Hospitality Group, Four Seasons Hotels, The Georgia Aquarium, Outback Steakhouse, Tedís Montana Grill, the Krystal Company, Chubb Insurance, and Liberty Insurance Company.

Mr. Hunt received his J.D. from the College of William & Mary, his B.S., magna cum laude from Boston University and his B.A., magna cum laude from Boston University.

Mr. Hunt can be contacted at 404-766-0076 or jhunt@stokeswagner.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.