Ms. Childs

Carolyn Childs

Principal

Mytravelresearch.com

Carolyn Childs has spent more than 25 years’ helping businesses achieve their goals by using research and other evidence to guide strategy and planning – mainly in the aviation, travel and tourism fields. She has worked in more than 35 countries on every inhabited continent and brings a detailed understanding of customers and how to connect with them.

As well as running her own businesses, Ms. Childs has worked for organizations such as the International Air Transport Association, TNS (the world’s largest custom research company) and ran the Travel Research Centre for 8 years. Her clients include blue chip names across the industry including Aer Rianta, Tourism Australia, TurEspana (Spanish national tourism organisation), Air New Zealand, Qantas and Emirates.

Ms. Childs' passion is making a difference and she does this by making research accessible and business focused. With Bronwyn White, she co-created Domesticate™ (now owned by TNS) – one of the industry’s most respected sources of strategic direction for the Australian domestic tourism market. Ms. Childs set up MyTravelResearch.com with Ms. White in 2011 to help fulfill this passion by making the tools, approaches and insights accessible to everyone.

Ms. Chiilds is a regular speaker at conferences and writes blogs for Sparksheet (on behalf of TNS) and MyTravelResearch.com. She has written an e-book “Same, same but different: Connecting with Consumers in Emerging Markets” She is a Full Member of the (UK) Market Research Society), contributes to the UNWTO panel of world tourism experts and is a founding board member of the TTRA Asia Pacific Chapter

Ms. Childs can be contacted at 61-0-416-213962 or carolyn@mytravelresearch.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.