Ms. Dobney

Angie Dobney

Vice President of Pricing & Revenue Management Services

Rainmaker Group

Angie Dobney was named Vice President of Pricing and Revenue Management Services for The Rainmaker Group in July 2014.

Based out of Rainmaker’s Las Vegas office, Ms. Dobney is responsible for leading and managing a tight-knit team that offers traditional hotel and casino-hotel properties a wide range of services, including helping uncover new revenue opportunities, temporary revenue management staffing, as well as hiring and training new revenue management hires.

For new Rainmaker customers, Ms. Dobney and her team can serve as a de facto revenue management service – helping to set, guide and execute a property’s strategies. The service was created to assist traditional hotel and casino-hotel properties in the often-difficult task of finding and hiring experienced revenue management professionals.

Ms. Dobney’s team is not limiting its services to Rainmaker customers only. Her long-range plan is to provide a diversity of services to companies of all sizes, including managing all distribution partners, corporate strategic assessments, and fine-tuning a property’s wholesale or OTA partners.

The hospitality/revenue management executive, respected consultant, and longtime Rainmaker customer began her professional career in hotel operations. From 1998-2004, she held positions in sales and account management for leading software companies, including Springer-Miller Systems and Newmarket International.

Ms. Dobney began her revenue management career with Hard Rock Hotel, Las Vegas, in the spring of 2004. After a nearly seven-year stint as Hard Rock’s executive director of revenue management, she joined Station Casinos as its corporate director of revenue management. Most recently, she was president and lead consultant of The Dobney Group, a Las Vegas-based hospitality consulting company.

Ms. Dobney earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Hotel Management from the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) and earned Mentor of the Year Award in 2007. She is actively involved with her alma mater, currently serving as a guest lecturer.

Ms. Dobney can be contacted at 702-580-5355 or angie.dobney@letitrain.com

Coming Up In The December Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Hotel Law: Issues & Events
There is not a single area of a hotel’s operation that isn’t touched by some aspect of the law. Hotels and management companies employ an army of lawyers to advise and, if necessary, litigate issues which arise in the course of conducting their business. These lawyers typically specialize in specific areas of the law – real estate, construction, development, leasing, liability, franchising, food & beverage, human resources, environmental, insurance, taxes and more. In addition, issues and events can occur within the industry that have a major impact on the whole, and can spur further legal activity. One event which is certain to cause repercussions is Marriott International’s acquisition of Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide. This newly combined company is now the largest hotel company in the world, encompassing 30 hotel brands, 5,500 hotels under management, and 1.1 million hotel rooms worldwide. In the hospitality industry, scale is particularly important – the most profitable companies are those with the most rooms in the most locations. As a result, this mega- transaction is likely to provoke an increase in Mergers & Acquisitions industry-wide. Many experts believe other larger hotel companies will now join forces with smaller operators to avoid being outpaced in the market. Companies that had not previously considered consolidation are now more likely to do so. Another legal issue facing the industry is the regulation of alternative lodging companies such as Airbnb and other firms that offer private, short-term rentals. Cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles and Santa Monica are at the forefront of efforts to legalize and control short-term rentals. However, those cities are finding it’s much easier to adopt regulations on short-term rentals than it is to actually enforce them. The December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine these and other critical issues pertaining to hotel law and how some companies are adapting to them.